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Opinion

Nottingham Forest spending comparisons with Newcastle United – A big fail

1 week ago
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A lot of debate following Newcastle United’s win at Nottingham Forest.

This has become the norm after pretty much every Newcastle match, especially now we have started winning once again.

Usually, the post-match debate involves trying to find reasons and arguments as to why Eddie Howe’s side supposedly didn’t deserve to win, all kinds of ingenious theories used.

Or at the very least, if even remotely credible reasons / arguments can’t be dreamt up, the debate then switches to anything to discredit Newcastle United and / or dilute our enjoyment of the victory.

This was perfectly summed up with the Mackem match.

Beforehand, we were told this was a disaster in the making for Eddie Howe and Newcastle United, local rivals Sunderland with a young and exciting dangerous team, at that point in a promotion play-off spot and set to potentially push Eddie Howe over the edge and get him the sack.

In their dreams.

Anyway, instead of the pre-match Mackem fantasies, reality delivered the most one-sided Tyne / Wear derby for decades, arguably even more so than the Halloween 5-1 special at St James’ Park.

It was embarrassing the gulf in class from the first whistle, Sunderland too scared to even try and attack. Newcastle United cruised through the 90 minutes and the Mackems got lucky with only three goals conceded. Sunderland threatened very briefly for a few minutes in the second half that they might get a consolation, amusingly, the only real threat the Mackems produced (they didn’t even win a corner!) was a couple of efforts from a player who then quickly went on strike to force his way out of their club, Alex Pritchard seeing Birmingham as a better proposition.

Anyway, after that Mackem match, the media totally switched, indicating that 3-0 was actually the bare minimum that should have been expected from Newcastle United. Conveniently ignoring the struggles elsewhere for Premier League clubs against lower league ones, lower league clubs that weren’t derby rivals! West Ham failing to beat second tier Bristol City home and away, going out of the FA Cup at Ashton Gate, simply one of those things.

Back to Nottingham Forest though.

I was laughing when I saw some of their fans after the game, complaining about the spending comparisons with Newcastle United!!!

My instant thought was clearly there must be two Nottingham Forests!

The one we had just played and defeated, a totally different one to that other Nottingham Forest who had gone on the maddest supermarket sweep style dash, bringing in almost 50 signings these past two seasons, including 30 alone in the summer 2022 and January 2023 transfer windows!

It isn’t the fault of Newcastle United that the Nottingham Forest spending has been so scattergun and disastrous, leading to a Premier League charge on allegedly breaking PSR / FFP rules AND having so little to show for it on the pitch, in their squad.

These past two seasons and four transfer windows have seen Nottingham Forest spend €326.30m (£278.52m), compared to Newcastle United in the same period spending €338.55m (£288.98m) on new signings (all stats via Transfermarkt).

Bottom line is that these last four windows, Newcastle United have only spent around £10m more than Nottingham Forest AND that has been to a backdrop of far higher revenues coming in than at Forest AND having far more to show for it on the pitch.

I wouldn’t care but Newcastle’s two most expensive signings in this time period and most expensive in the club’s history, neither Alexander Isak (£63m) nor Sandro Tonali (£55m) were involved against Nottingham Forest, as well as all the others who were missing (as usual!).

When you look at the team that faced Nottingham Forest, the likes of Dubravka, Schar, Longstaff, Miley, Trippier and Burn cost around a combined £32m, more than half our starting eleven!

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