No Newcastle player in this summer’s England squad but nice to hear that we do own a little bit of fame still when it comes to England heroes of the past.

Turns out that 95 year old Ivor Broadis is the oldest surviving England international.

The former ‘inside forward’ was a popular player at St James Park in the 1950s, even though he only lasted two seasons due to a falling out with trainer (equivalent of manager at the time) Norman Smith.

For the national team, Ivor Broadis scored eight goals in 14 international appearances.

The one-time Newcastle star has the distinction of being  only the second NUFC player to score at a World Cup finals, with Aleksandar Mitrovic becoming the seventh when scoring against Switzerland earlier this month.

It was at the World Cup in Switzerland in 1954 when Ivor Broadis had his moment in the spotlight, George Robledo had scored four years earlier for Chile against the USA, Broadis going one better when scoring twice in a 4-4 draw with Belgium. Alan Shearer is the only other Newcastle player to score two goals at World Cup finals whilst on the club’s books.

Those finals in Switzerland were quite amazing, that 4-4 England draw with Belgium helping to generate an average of 5.38 goals per game throughout the tournament, easily the most see at any World Cup finals (full list below).

In fact no finals since 1958 have averaged 3 goals or better per game and the current one in Russia is seen as going well so far despite an average of only 2.64 goals, although England have contributed well, their two matches having generated 10 goals in total so far, an average of 5.00 goals per game.

As well as being England’s oldest living player, not surprising that Ivor (he was named Ivan but became known as Ivor when his name was wrongly written down when playing for Tottenham as a guest during World War Two) Broadis is also Newcastle’s oldest living former player.

Back in June 1954 when England drew 4-4 with Belgium, this was the starting 11:

Gilbert Merrick, Ron Staniforth, Roger Byrne, Billy Wright (c), Syd Owen, Jimmy Dickinson, Stanley Matthews, Ivor Broadis, Nat Lofthouse, Tommy Taylor, Tom Finney

A really good interview with Ivor Broadis today, when speaking to the official NUFC site:

“These were truly great players (at the 1954 World Cup finals in Switzerland).

“I was in such esteemed company but I include everyone in this by saying representing your country at the World Cup was the absolute pinnacle of your career; the be all and end all.

“I had the greatest admiration for all my teammates – but especially Stanley Matthews, who was such an outstanding player and a real gentleman too.

“Belgium scored early on but I’d equalised before Nat put us ahead.

“I made it 3-1 and we thought that would be enough but they got it back to 3-3 before two injury time goals, one for each side, made it 4-4. A quite remarkable game really.

“We then beat Switzerland 2-0 three days later which took us through to the quarter-finals where we would be up against holders Uruguay.

“It was a topsy-turvy game but they beat us 4-2 and I have to say it was a pretty physical encounter.

“I knew that Jackie Milburn and George Robledo had played in the World Cup in Brazil in 1950 and Jackie told me what an amazing experience it had been.

“I didn’t play with George but I met him and his brother Ted when I was in Uruguay with England and the Chileans were there too.

“George had scored four years earlier in the Finals and so to become only the second United player to achieve that feat was a great moment for me.

“That Uruguay game turned out to be my last cap for England. I was 31 and had enjoyed a good career which continued for one more season on Tyneside before I moved on to Carlisle United.

“I hope the team does well in Russia (this time)

“It will be fantastic if they can go all the way but we’ll just have to wait and see.

“And certainly, watching the game tonight will just bring back a few happy World Cup memories of my own.”

Goals scored by Newcastle United players at World Cup finals:

Brazil 1950

Jorge (George) Robledo scores for Chile

Chile 5 USA 2

Switzerland 1954

Ivor Broadis scores two for England

England 4 Belgium 4

Mexico 1986

Peter Beardsley scores for England

England 3 Paraguay 0

France 1998

Alan Shearer scores for England

England 2 Tunisia 0

Alan Shearer scores (a penalty) for England

England 2 Argentina 2

Germany 2006

Craig Moore scores (a penalty) for Australia

Australia 2 Croatia 2

Brazil 2014

Moussa Sissoko scores for France

France 5 Switzerland 2

Russia 2018

Aleksandar Mitrovic scores for Serbia

Serbia 1 Switzerland 2

Goals per game average from every World Cup tournament – Stats via Statista:

3.89 – Uruguay 1930

4.12 – Italy 1934

4.67 – France 1938

4.00 – Brazil 1950

5.38 – Switzerland 1954

3.60 – Sweden 1958

2.78 – Chile 1962

2.78 – England 1966

2.97 – Mexico 1970

2.55 – West Germany 1974

2.68 – Argentina 1978

2.81 – Spain 1982

2.54 – Mexico 1986

2.21 – Italy 1990

2.71 – USA 1994

2.67 – France 1998

2.52 – Japan/South Korea 2002

2.30 – Germany 2006

2.23 – South Africa 2010

2.70 – Brazil 2014

2.64 – Russia 2018 (after 44 games – before today’s (Thursday’s) matches)



  • Rich Lawson

    Love the humility and sheer joy in just playing he exhibits,so different from the spoilt brats we have to put up with today,no daft haircuts,tattoo’s,bad social behaviour or omnipresent agent.Get him out on the pitch pre match this season NUFC for a crowd salute. Classy bloke.

    • Peter C

      At the minute we need something to cheer about.

      Ivor is one of the players of the team of the 1950’s, that my late dad used to enthuse and tell me about, and how good they were.

      When Newcastle owned Wembley so to speak, and a trip to the FA Cup Final was a regular event.

      How he raved about, the one and only JET Milburn, Len White, Joe Harvey, the Robledo’s, Bobby Mitchell, Frank Brennan and others, and in one particularly genuine hardman, by the name of Jimmy Scoular. If only we had a team like them now.

  • Philippines

    FANTASTIC.