Mike Ashley has today promised to sell Newcastle United, or at least try to…

Not surprisingly there has been dancing in the streets as fans look forward to this happy occasion.

Forgive me if I don’t join in with these celebrations just yet.

I have no problems with anybody who believes we can already start planning the month long party for this imminent event.

However, I do have a problem with those Newcastle supporters who see it as a done deal, having a go at other fans who are saying they have heard it all before.

I have lost count of the number of times the club has been up for sale, if this was your house you’d be asking  serious questions of your estate agent…prime city centre spot, needs some loving care and attention but what a desirable buy.

The first time Mike Ashley officially put Newcastle United up for sale was over nine years ago.

In a 1,664 word statement, he laid out his reasons for why he was (allegedly) going to sell the club, as well as taking the chance to say a lot of other things as well. Most of which were blatant, and not so blatant, digs at the supporters.

That statement which Ashley released on 14 September 2008 is reproduced below, after he forced Keegan out of the club and the fans demonstrated against him, well worth a read.

His hatred and contempt for the Newcastle fanbase oozes out all over the place.

Some of the highlights….

‘Dennis (Wise) and his team have done a first class job in scouting for talent to secure the future of the club…The plan is showing dividends with the signing of exceptional young talent such as Sebastien Bassong, Danny Guthrie and Xisco.’

Don’t laugh.

‘Look at Jonas Guttierrez and Fabricio Collocini. These are world class players.’

This would be Jonas Gutierrez who would later take Mike Ashley and NUFC to a tribunal, where it was found proven that they had discriminated against him when he developed cancer. The order having also gone out for John Carver to tell Ryan Taylor to pass his mobile to Jonas, so he could tell him he was no longer wanted.

‘We, my kids and I, have loved standing on the terraces with the fans…We have absolutely loved it but it is not safe anymore for us as a family. I am now a dad who can’t take his kids to a football game on a Saturday because I am advised that we would be assaulted. Therefore, I am no longer prepared to subsidise Newcastle United.’

It was claimed that threats from fans had been passed on to Northumbria Police but that was later shown to be lies, with no such threats having been made.

‘My investment in the club has extended to time, effort and yet again, money being poured into the Academy.’

This is an Academy that was due to be rebuilt some years ago to provide state of the art facilities to allow Newcastle to compete with the best in Europe, yet still not a brick has been laid.

‘I have the interests of Newcastle United at heart. I have listened to you. You want me out. That is what I am now trying to do but it won’t happen overnight and it may not happen at all if a buyer does not come in. You don’t need to demonstrate against me again because I have got the message. Any further action will only have an adverse effect on the team. As fans of Newcastle United you need to spend your energy getting behind, not me, but the players who need your support.’

The first of many many blatant attempts to end/dilute demonstrations/campaigns against him, by claiming he was now doing what fans wanted (selling the club).

‘Kevin (Keegan) and I always got on. Everyone at the club, and I mean everyone, thinks that he has few equals in getting the best out of the players. He is a legend at the club and rightly so. Clearly there are disagreements between Kevin and the Board and we have both put that in the hands of our lawyers.’

It is disagreements between Kevin Keegan and ‘the Board’. Funny how it was Mike Ashley who employed his mate Dennis Wise and gave him the final say on transfers – after Keegan had been led to believe he had the final say, as proven at KK’s tribunal for constructive dismissal

‘It has to be realised that if I put £100 million into the club year in year out then it would not be too long before I was cleaned out and a debt ridden Newcastle United would find itself in the position that faced Leeds United.’

Just how similar does this sound to nine years later when Mike Ashley claimed we were all expecting him to buy Neymar for £200m!!

The most laughable thing is that all of this statement from nine years ago makes out that Ashley was doing us all a big favour when buying the club from the Halls and Shepherds.

John Hall said that Ashley’s people told him that he was buying the club to promote his retail empire worldwide and after 10 years NUFC ownership and free promotion of Sports Direct and the rest around the globe, both Ashley and SD have seen their profits/value massively grow.

I live in hope that at last Mike Ashley is going to go – but not in expectation.

Mike Ashley Statement – 14 September 2008:

I have enjoyed sport since I was a boy. I love football. I have followed England in every tournament since Mexico ’86. I was there to see Maradona and his hand of God. I know what it means to love football and to love a club. I know how important it is to other people because football is so important to me.

My life has been tied up with sport. It was the passion that I felt for sport that helped me to be successful with my business. That success allowed me to mix my passion and my business.

I bought Newcastle United in May 2007. Newcastle attracted me because everyone in England knows that it has the best fans in football. When the fans are behind the club at St James’ Park it makes the hairs on the back of your neck stand up. It is magic. Newcastle’s best asset has been, is and always will be the fans.

But like any business with assets the club has debts. I paid £134 million out of my own pocket for the club. I then poured another £110 million into the club not to pay off the debt but just to reduce it. The club is still in debt. Even worse than that, the club still owes millions of pounds in transfer fees. I shall be paying out many more millions over the coming year to pay for players bought by the club before I arrived.

But there was a double whammy. Commercial deals such as sponsorships and advertising had been front loaded. The money had been paid upfront and spent. I was left with a club that owed millions and part of whose future had been mortgaged. Unless I had come into the club then it might not have survived. It could have shared the fate of other clubs who have borrowed too heavily against their future. Before I had spent a penny on wages or buying players Newcastle United had cost me more than a quarter of a billion pounds.

Don’t get me wrong. I did not buy Newcastle to make money. I bought Newcastle because I love football. Newcastle does not generate the income of a Manchester United or a Real Madrid. I am Mike Ashley, not Mike Ashley a multi-billionaire with unlimited resources. Newcastle United and I can’t do what other clubs can. We can’t afford it.

I knew that the club would cost me money every year after I had bought it. I have backed the club with money. You can see that from the fact that Newcastle has the fifth highest wage bill in the Premier League. I was always prepared to bank roll Newcastle up to the tune of £20 million per year but no more. That was my bargain. I would make the club solvent. I would make it a going concern. I would pour up to £20 million a year into the club and not expect anything back. It has to be realised that if I put £100 million into the club year in year out then it would not be too long before I was cleaned out and a debt ridden Newcastle United would find itself in the position that faced Leeds United.

That is the nightmare for every fan. To love a club that overextends itself, that tries to spend what it can’t afford.

That will never happen to Newcastle when I am in charge. The truth is that Newcastle could not sustain buying the Shevchenko’s, Robinho’s or the Berbatov’s. These are recognised European footballers. They have played in the European leagues and everyone knows about them. They can be brilliant signings. But everybody knows that they are brilliant and so they, and players like them, cost more than £30 million to buy before you even take into account agent commissions and the multi-million pound wage deals.

My plan and my strategy for Newcastle is different. It has to be. Arsenal is the shining example in England of a sustainable business model. It takes time. It can’t be done overnight. Newcastle has therefore set up an extensive scouting system. We look for young players, for players in foreign leagues who everyone does not know about. We try and stay ahead of the competition. We search high and low looking for value, for potential that we can bring on and for players who will allow Newcastle to compete at the very highest level but who don’t cost the earth.

I am prepared to back large signings for millions of pounds but for a player who is young and has their career in front of them and not for established players at the other end of their careers. There is no other workable way forward for Newcastle. It is in this regard that Dennis and his team have done a first class job in scouting for talent to secure the future of the club.

You only need to look at some of our signings to see that it is working, slowly working. Look at Jonas Guttierrez and Fabricio Collocini. These are world class players. The plan is showing dividends with the signing of exceptional young talent such as Sebastien Bassong, Danny Guthrie and Xisco.

My investment in the club has extended to time, effort and yet again, money being poured into the Academy. I want Newcastle to be able to create its own legends of the future to rival those of the past. This is a long term plan. A long term plan for the future of the club so that it can flourish.

One person alone can’t manage a Premiership football club and scout the world looking for world class players and stars of the future. It needs a structure and it needs people who are dedicated to that task. It needs all members of the management team to share that vision for it to work.

Also one of the reasons that the club was so in debt when I took over was due to transfer dealings caused by managers moving in and out of the club. Every time there was a change in manager millions would be spent on new players and millions would be lost as players were sold. It can’t keep on working like that. It is just madness.

I have put Newcastle on a sound financial footing. It is reducing its debt. It is spending within itself. It is recruiting exciting new players and bringing in players for the future.

The fans want this process to happen more quickly and they want huge amounts spent in the transfer market so that the club can compete at the top table of European football now. I am not stupid and have listened to the fans. I have really loved taking my kids to the games, being next to them and all the fans. But I am now a dad who can’t take his kids to a football game on a Saturday because I am advised that we would be assaulted. Therefore, I am no longer prepared to subsidise Newcastle United.

I am putting the club up for sale. I hope that the fans get what they want and that the next owner is someone who can lavish the amount of money on the club that the fans want.

This will not be a fire sale. Newcastle is now in a much stronger position than it was in 2007. It is planning for the future and it is sustainable.

I am still a fan of Newcastle United. We, my kids and I, have loved standing on the terraces with the fans, we have loved travelling with the away fans and we have met so many fans whose company we have enjoyed. We have absolutely loved it but it is not safe anymore for us as a family.

I am very conscious of the responsibility that I bear in owning Newcastle United. Tough decisions have to be made in business and I will not shy away from doing what I consider to be in the best interests of the club. This is not fantasy football.

I don’t want anyone to read my words and think that any of this is an attack on Kevin Keegan. It is not. Kevin and I always got on. Everyone at the club, and I mean everyone, thinks that he has few equals in getting the best out of the players. He is a legend at the club and rightly so. Clearly there are disagreements between Kevin and the Board and we have both put that in the hands of our lawyers.

I hope that all the fans get to read this statement so that they understand what I am about. I would not expect all of the fans to agree with me. But I have set out, clearly, my plan. If I can’t sell the club to someone who will give the fans what they want then I shall continue to ensure that Newcastle is run on a business and football model that is sustainable. I care too much about the club merely to abandon it.

I have the interests of Newcastle United at heart. I have listened to you. You want me out. That is what I am now trying to do but it won’t happen overnight and it may not happen at all if a buyer does not come in.

You don’t need to demonstrate against me again because I have got the message. Any further action will only have an adverse effect on the team. As fans of Newcastle United you need to spend your energy getting behind, not me, but the players who need your support.

I am determined that Newcastle United is not only here today, but that it is also there tomorrow for your children who stand beside you at St James’ Park.

Mike Ashley.

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  • Brian Standen

    Of course your points are accurate and valid, I just get the feeling something is different this time! Or is that just hope?

    • Guest 2

      Probably hope, mate, along with our general desperation to see the back of him. Poor old Fleckman and the Monkseaton Mag must be sobbing their hearts out to their teddy bears tonight.

      • Peaky Magpie

        Teddy bears ? More like Ashley cuddly toys !

    • Damon Horner

      He has already been conducting business deals and apparently we have a lot of existing NDA’s, the statement above sounds like it has a hint of emotion, frustration and a sense he has been wronged, it does feel different this time but until a takeover is done it will always remain hope!.

  • Rich Lawson

    It’s all down to how much he wants for it and if he is prepared to compromise to be out by Christmas ?( There’s my 1st present taken care of !)

  • Lee Mcguigan

    Who would buy a club that are under investigation for tax fraud? Pissible points deduction ? Relegation? Hopefully not but i cant see anyone investing hundreds of millions until this is resolved.

    • Geordie-7676

      Is this tripe still going around? There are court transcripts available to read, that clearly state that the club is under investigation for a possible tax avoidance of £1.9million.

      £1.9million is peanuts in the footballing world, absolute peanuts. There will not be any points deductions and certainly no relegation imposed by the FA as the tax avoidance did not, in any way influence the game in any way. Sanctions are in place for situations where a club is unsustainable (Such as Rangers) financially.

      • 1957

        HMRC know this sort of thing goes on everywhere, but got lucky in this case that Simon Stainrod named us while he was under investigation for tax avoidance. Can’t see relegation as an issue, but the club would at least have to repay the £1.9m plus compound interest and a fine to HMRC.

        • Geordie-7676

          I have no doubt that the individuals involved are guilty, therefore it is the club that will be penalised, but only in a financial sense. The FA won’t do anything about it, because if they did, i can guarantee you that the involved UK clubs, NUFC and West Ham would demand a full investigation of ALL transactions that have taken place in the same period between all clubs, a right to which they are entitled. That would cost an amount of money that would run into multi-billions…..the FA wouldnt touch it with a barge pole.

          As for the financial sanctions, repay the £1.9million, cover court costs and fine…..the fine would be the most expensive out of them all, but still, anything over £10million total is extremely far fetched.

    • Hughie_Gallacher

      I understand that the normal procedure is for the buyer to ask for an indemnity, so that he will be compensated should the club receive a financial penalty.
      A possible stain on the reputation of the club, of course, is another matter. You can’t put a figure on that.