Monday night brought final confirmation that Ian Cathro had indeed left Newcastle United.

Rafa Benitez wished his coach well and said it was important for people to reach their full potential, so this opportunity at Hearts was perfect for the 30 year old.

Always difficult to tell how much influence any member of the backroom staff has at a football club, though Benitez was keen to say his recent manager of the month award was one for all of his coaching team as well as him.

After dealing with the pressures of working at clubs such as Valencia and Newcastle, taking on the job at Hearts will surely be within his comfort zone – whatever nobodies such as Kris Boyd say.

It is of course the first management/Head Coach role for Ian Cathro and at the age of 30 he becomes the youngest ever in the history of the Scottish top flight. Although the man he replaces, Robbie Neilson, was only 33 when he took on the job and he has left the club in a position of fighting it out for European football and the runners-up spot.

So best of luck to Ian Cathro and Newcastle fans will be keeping an eye on how he gets on.

This is what he said when joining Newcastle in June 2015, clear even then that he had management on his mind:

“This (joining Newcastle) is something that can only prepare me even better for when the time comes (to become a manager/head coach).

“I am incredibly excited by it and I just want to help out in any way I can.’

Ian Cathro speaking to Hearts TV – 5 December 2016:

“This is a step I have wanted to take, one I have prepared for and I think the circumstances are perfect. I just want to get to work.

“What will the fans get?

“A team that wants to win. A team that when the first whistle goes, irrespective of the circumstances, the opponent, home, away, rain, sun, no matter what. When the first whistle goes we will expect to win.

“And we will work to find a way in which we believe that we can win.

“We’re going to want to use the ball, we’re going to want to be incredibly energetic, we’ll want to attack and score goals. We want to be aggressive and be as close to the opponent’s goal as we possibly can.

“We’ll make it an exciting place to come. Will it always be perfect? No it won’t.

“But everybody will be at maximum all the time. It could be an enjoyable ride.”