The Newcastle United transfer strategy explained…

Ashley’s reign began with him allowing Allardyce to bring in over the hill players on short-term massive salaries such as Geremi and Viduka, plus established average Premier League players such as Smith and Barton on five year superstar level wages.

newcastle united transfer strategyWe then had our South American/Latin interlude when Dennis Wise and his cronies were allowed to undermine Keegan and bring in Xisco, Coloccini (who came in for around £10m and massive wages) and Jonas. What is often forgotten about is that another South American, Ignacio Gonzalez, was also brought in at that time – with it later being revealed the deal for him was solely as a sweetener to agents who they were hoping to get future benefits from. Talk about summing up that Wise era!

We then of course moved on to the much heralded buy youngish and cheap, or damaged goods (Marveaux, Ben Arfa etc), then see their value rise. Great when it works but for every Cabaye we have Gosling, Marveaux, Ben Arfa (in his current state), Mapou and so on.

The latest transfer strategy is seemingly to buy nobody! At least that is one that is simple to understand. Short-term loans are now seemingly Ashley’s key to Premier League survival and talk about a massive shift in ‘strategy’. One minute you make grand claims to buy the best young talent as long-term investments to build the club blah blah blah and then the next you are renting players short-term to try and keep your head above water and paying to increase the value of somebody else’s asset!

Of course, there is only one transfer strategy you can see since Ashley rode into toon. That is making a profit on transfers in nearly every transfer window and ending up making tens of millions profit from the trading of players.

At Newcastle United there should be four main revenue streams instead of the three that all normal clubs benefit from.

As well as TV, Commercial and Matchday revenues, there should be a figure in Newcastle’s for player trading profit.

Under Ashley, only the TV money and profits from selling players have gone up (While on the other hand money from matchdays and commercial deals has dramatically collapsed) – and yet you still get a minority of crazy people claiming Mike Ashley is running the club well from a financial viewpoint.