In an otherwise barren month of (transfer) inactivity, it is good to see Newcastle United can at least still wind some people up.

Recently, Mick Quinn reacted to news of Tammy Abraham reportedly choosing Swansea over Newcastle, by questioning why anybody would want to go to the Welsh club ahead of the Magpies, Quinny declaring what a ‘massive’ club NUFC were.

Now one of Swansea’s former players/legends has bounced it back, declaring ‘To say Newcastle United are a massive club is just not right’.

One-time Swansea striker Lee Trundle says ‘Massive clubs do not get relegated out of the Premier League twice within the space of a decade’.

That’s us told.

Though I do agree with Lee Trundle that it isn’t Newcastle’s nightlife that has been a barrier to Tammy Abraham coming to NUFC.

He says it is Swansea’s style of football on the pitch but I reckon it will be all down to guaranteed playing time.

Lee Trundle speaking to Wales Online:

“I saw Micky Quinn’s comments this week, saying he couldn’t believe the striker had turned down a ‘massive club’ to move to Swansea.

“I didn’t agree with that at all.

“Newcastle are a great club, with great support, there is no doubt about it and I am sure playing every week in front of 52,000 on Tyneside is a great experience for a player.

“But to say Newcastle United are a massive club is just not right.

“Massive clubs do not get relegated out of the Premier League twice within the space of a decade.

“Of the two clubs, Swansea have established themselves in the Premier League,

“While Newcastle, no matter what they have done previously, are newly promoted.

“Swansea have a track record of developing young players and of producing a style of football that tests a player’s technical ability.

“I saw there was a suggestion he was advised not to go to Newcastle because of the nightlife, but I personally think it would have been far more about what he would get out of the on-field experience at each club, and I think coming to Swansea will be the right move for Tammy and the club.

“As a striker, I am particularly excited by Abraham.

“I know a few people at Bristol City from my time there and they all spoke very highly of him.

“He has a great pedigree coming from Chelsea, and it’s worth remembering he scored 26 goals last season in a team that ended up battling to avoid relegation.

“He is a big, imposing forward, but he also has good pace and movement to go with it and I can see it being a good move for him and for Swansea City.”



  • goggsy

    Wonder if he thinks man city are a “big club”. Really who cares.

  • MadMag83

    Massive in terms of fan base but pathetic in terms of success since the fat man took over. For Swansea I can see relegation at some point in the not too distant future, they haven’t had the same success with youth as Southampton and they’ve done nothing in the league to suggest they’re doing anything other than surviving, and that will catch them out eventually like it has done for us, twice.

    • John Wilson

      Were too successful before Ashley either!!!

  • toonterrier

    A club that attracts fifty thousand supporters in the Championship is my idea of a massive club. Unfortunately when you have an owner who wont spend money and is happy with surviving in the top league then you’re on a loser. Hopefully he will sell up sooner rather than later then people like myself who walked away from the club last season will look forward to going back.

    • Geordiegiants

      Last season?????? You should of walked when he abused Keegan.
      Everyone should of!
      It was as obvious as the nose on Phil Thompsons face he was going to f’ck us over for years to come back then.

      • Franzcarrsuperstar

        Should have

        • Geordiegiants

          Zzzzzzz

          • Franzcarrsuperstar

            Sorry

  • Soldier

    many of his points are correct

  • Paul9

    Who’s this lee trundle fellow

  • Paul Patterson

    Back in your box whoever you are..

  • Lhc

    Lee trundle love’s dvd’s

  • Lhc

    He was a decent player on his day, quite skillfull

  • wheyayeman

    We WERE a massive club we do have a massive fanbase, we do have massive potential, we do have a massive hope in Rafa, we do have a great Stadium etc etc but a massive club in my mind is one which is sincerely competing for the league, cups and in the Champions League. Therefore we will not be a massive club again unless Ashley opens his Massive cheque book and aims to get us back where Rafa would like to take us. Simple. Until that happens we remain a massive disappointment under Ashley

    • HarryHype59

      All true!

  • WilliamVenus

    Lee Trundle now, dear God !!!

    • Jezza

      Yes given the chance during his playing career there is no way he would have turned down a move from Swansea to Newcastle.

  • Himanshu Dhingra

    We were a big club, Ashley has turned us into a basket case.

  • GeordieZebra

    Nothing too controversial. He’s generally right.

  • Rich Lawson

    Swansea were in desperate trouble last season with the american bloke and got a bounce with Lambert,they will be in the bottom 6 again this season.

  • GToon

    Unfortunately he’s right on every count. And until Rafa starts creating a better history for us then players are going to make the decision that Abraham has.

  • lukegte

    He’s spot on. I think Tammy made the right choice

  • Geordiegiants

    Lee who?

  • Delashio

    Can’t really disagree with that.

  • Phil K

    Lets put it simply, shall we ? Swansea in the Prem have HALF the average of Newcastle in the Championship. THAT says it all.
    That Swansea’s board of directors splash more cash doesn’t make them bigger.
    When have the media went out of their way to attack Swansea as they always do to Newcastle ?
    Swansea fades into the wallpaper in the nations football fans interest.
    Thats the sign of a “big club”

  • Phil K

    By the way – who the hell is “Lee Trundle” ?
    The comments of a nobody like this prat on the subject of how “big” a club is rather like asking somebody standing outside a pub with a pint in one hand and a tab in the other – and just as relevant