Sting left Tyneside in 1977 but he had already seen his all-time hero.

Forming The Police and having a stellar music career with Stewart Copeland and Andy Summers, it was eight years earlier when he’d seen his greatest sporting moment.

Sting says that he went to a lot of games in the Fairs Cup winning season, with his hero being the captain of that side, Bobby Moncur.

Despite everything that has happened in the meantime, the Geordie musician from Wallsend says that Moncur is still his hero.

Aged 17 when Newcastle tasted European success, Sting would never have believed that now turned 65, he wouldn’t have seen any silverware since.

The exiled Newcastle United fan saying ‘it (the Fairs Cup) was fantastic but we need to win another trophy’.

Sting and his son Joe Sumner were speaking to BBC Sport having been asked to do the Premier League predictions for this weekend. Mark Lawrenson tipped Sunderland to beat West Ham but Sting and his son went for the Mackems to only draw.

Sting talking to BBC Sport:

“Football played a big part in my life growing up in Wallsend.

“The last trophy we won was the Fairs Cup in 1969 and I went to a lot of our home games during that run.

“Bobby Moncur was the captain and he was my hero – he still is.

“My favourite players are from that era – people like Jim Iley, all those old people.

“Footballers always seemed much older than me but now they seem like my children. It’s strange, it is just an age thing.

“Winning the Fairs Cup is still the best moment I’ve had as a Newcastle fan – it was fantastic, but we need to win another trophy.”

Joe Sumner (Sting’s son) wasn’t born on Tyneside but Sting has ensured he is a Newcastle fan:

“I grew up in north London, so it was a strange kind of cultural mix where all my friends were either Tottenham or Arsenal supporters.

“Most of them were Spurs fans, so despite supporting Newcastle, who nobody else I knew cared about, I have sort of developed that Tottenham-style dislike of Arsenal – it is them I cannot stand losing to.”