Ian Holloway says that he has been doing some deep thinking ahead of the Aston Villa v Newcastle game this weekend.

The manager turned pundit saying ‘I have gone through this game a million times in my head’ but Holloway then claiming that each time he has come up with a ‘different prediction’.

Despite Newcastle’s defeat to Wolves on Saturday, the form of the two teams couldn’t be more different.

Villa have only won one game all season and that was six weeks ago at home to Rotherham, whilst in contrast Newcastle have won seven of their last eight matches in all competitions.

Aston Villa have refused to supply any more tickets to Newcastle despite closing off sections of the ground for the entire season due to lack of demand.

The most recent home Championship crowd dropped under thirty thousand at Villa Park but despite this, Ian Holloway believes the home fans could be critical to Villa’s chances.

He says of Aston Villa score first then they could ‘win quite comfortably as the fans will be with them’.

Of course if Newcastle score first then as Ian Holloway is intimating, the Villa supporters are very likely to turn on their own players.

In the end, Holloway has predicted a 1-1 draw, exactly which team, if any, would settle for that in advance of the game is open to question.

Ian Holloway talking to Sky Sports:

“I have gone through this game a million times in my head and have come out with a different prediction each time.

“It’s going to be a brilliant clash played in a sensational atmosphere but it’s very tough to call.

“The first goal in this game will be more important than usual.

“If Aston Villa get it, they could go on and win quite comfortably as the fans will be with them.

“However, a first goal the other way could lead to a very open game and that will suit Newcastle. I’m on the fence.

“On a side note, Jack Grealish needs to sort his life out. There’s no use having talent if you’re not going be committed to your craft. Roberto Di Matteo is the perfect man to deal with him, but you can’t make someone listen, he has to want to listen.

“However, the problem is that some of these young kids get too much too soon and they’re not taught to listen. The power has gone the wrong way, it’s skewed far too much in the favour of the players.”