Chris Kamara has said that he is baffled by what Steve McClaren has had to say before the Newcastle v Norwich match on Sunday.

Kamara says that the Newcastle boss should be trying to inject confidence into his players, rather than telling the likes of Rob Elliot that by replacing Tim Krul it could cost the team 20 points this season.

As the media pundit points out, it is a very strange thing to be saying when Newcastle are still three points short of even getting 20 points on the board so far.

Chris Kamara says that the current position is different to the near calamity last season, according to him Newcastle almost sleepwalked into relegation under John Carver because the club didn’t realise that it was a possibility until it was almost too late.

Whilst that may have been true of the club, it certainly wasn’t the case with the Newcastle fans who could see all too clearly the danger that was unfolding.

Chris Kamara writing for Ladbrokes:

‘I don’t know if his comments have been taken out of context, but Steve McClaren’s comments about Tim Krul’s injury costing the club 20 points baffled me somewhat.

For a start, it’s a strange thing to be saying when you haven’t even got 20 points on the board yet. There’s time, but where are they going to come from now if that is the case?

At the end of the day, McClaren needs to be instilling confidence in his players, not having his players wondering how they are going to rack up the points.

He needs to either pull them together and say “yes, we’ve lost our best player, but we need to get on with it, work hard and get some good results, until I can go out and buy a replacement in January”, or just give the goalkeeper coming in some confidence and suggest that he is capable of stepping up to the plate and covering Krul’s absence with aplomb.

While they are still struggling, it is a different situation as to the one they were in last year.

Under John Carver it became apparent that they didn’t realise what mess they were in until it was almost too late.

I think they thought that when Pards had gone that they were safe and the realisation that they were in trouble didn’t sink in until late on.’