Newcastle fans will join supporters of the other 19 Premier League clubs, as well as fans of at least 10 Championship ones, to protest about away ticket prices.

The coordinated action this weekend is to further promote the calls for a £20 cap on away ticket prices.

The FSF (Football Supporters Federation) are co-ordinating the display banners at matches across the country this weekend, including at the Etihad on Saturday.

Newcastle fans are being charged up to £44 for the game against Manchester City, a ridiculous price in itself, but then dwarfed by the £64 Arsenal are charging Manchester United supporters.

Raymond Herlihy from Arsenal supporters’ group ‘Red Action’

“We are trying to get the issue out there because we are being priced out.

“Arsenal have got so much money in the bank but we are playing ridiculous prices compared to 20 or 30 years ago. Supporting them is a life sentence with no chance of parole.”

All of this at a time when there has never been more money in football, with that set to rocket again from next season, with the enhanced new TV contracts.

Kevin Miles, chief executive FSF:

“Pricing is a major barrier to watching live football for many fans.

“We’re delighted to see so many fan groups involved in the weekend of action – supporters are standing together against high prices.

“In the coming weeks, Premier League clubs have a choice to make when they carve up the latest multi-billion-pound media deal. Without match-going fans filling the stadiums, and particularly those who make such arduous away trips, football simply wouldn’t generate such wealth.

“Of course it’s not just in the Premier League that we see high prices, many Football League fixtures can be very expensive too.”

Supporters’ groups from Championship sides Cardiff, Leeds, Birmingham, Nottingham Forest, Hull City, QPR, Bolton, Reading, Middlesbrough and Bristol City are also set to join their top-flight counterparts in staging protests.

A Premier League spokesman said:

“While the most expensive tickets are subject to the most attention, the huge number of offers available at clubs are generally ignored. This approach does not provide a fair reflection of what the vast majority of fans are actually paying to attend Premier League football matches.”