One Newcastle player has stunned the western world by showing signs that not every football player is as thick as…something very thick.

With the perception being that footballers aren’t the brightest, Newcastle United goalkeeper Freddie Woodman is bucking the trend.

Currently on loan at Crawley Town, the keeper gave an interview to the Crawley News.

I love this sentence that they opened the piece with….:

‘FREELY admitting to spending his time reading lots of books, and psychology books at that, it is fair to say Freddie Woodman isn’t your typical footballer.’

Freely admitting…what’s that all about?!!!

You would think Freddie Woodman had at least owned up to a dodgy criminal past, or even worse, supporting Sunderland.

Not that he’d ‘admitted’ to a liking for reading books! My god, he will regret that one day now that everybody knows, the humiliation that he will go through…

There were some interesting quotes as well in the piece, both about the football and the seedier side of things – book reading!

The football bit:

“I would rather come on loan and have a lot to do, it’s obviously not nice conceding four goals twice but I have to deal with it. I’ve been happy with my performances but it’s about the team and getting the wins.

“I’ve enjoyed every minute here and it sounds strange, but even when we are losing, it has been amazing. I didn’t think I’d be playing in League Two this season but I feel like I’ve done well though.

“I think coming for crosses was a big thing. Everyone thought a 18-year-old kid in League Two wouldn’t come for crosses but I’ve got no fear.”

The reading books bit:

“Confidence is big thing in football. That’s why I work closely on the psychological side of it. It’s something I’ve done off my own back.

“I have been doing it for two years and it really interests me. I’ve been working with Steve Black, he used to work with Jonny Wilkinson, and now he works at the club (Newcastle United) after Steve McClaren brought him in. I ring him quite a bit and he gives me tasks to do that add to my game.

“He drills good habits into me, like playing the game in five minutes; you break the game down and if you can be brilliant for five minutes every five minutes then you’ve had the perfect match. But if you’ve had a bad five minutes, you forget about that and focus on having a good next five minutes.

“And if people see my Twitter, I read quite a lot. Mainly self-improvement books. I just pick out little things from the books.”