The Aleksandar Mitrovic saga continues but could be close to a conclusion, with the Belgian media carrying several Newcastle claims (clues?) today.

Whether or not Newcastle eventually land the striker remains to be seen, but it does look a definite that Newcastle are trying to bring him to the Premier League.

The latest quotes on the ongoing ‘transfer’ from Friday, seeing the following from both Mirovic and his father:

Ivica Mitrovic (the player’s father)

“Yes Newcastle is an option but we are still waiting for another club.”

Aleksandar Mitrovic (When asked about which club he is joining, speaking from Anderlecht’s training camp in Tegelen in Holland)

“What do you want me to say, I’m still here.”

Roma were originally claimed to be the player’s first choice but with no move from them, it was then reported that Mitrovic senior had engaged ‘super’ agent Pini Zahavi to negotiate a deal with another club who could offer Champions League football, with FC Porto said to be the new club favoured by the striker.

All the while, the Belgian media have claimed that an offer from Newcastle is lying there on the table, in the hope that the player will drop his search for Champions League football and give Tyneside a shot.

This morning photos (see below) appeared in Belgian newspapers which claimed to show the brother of Aleksandar Mitrovic on a visit to St James Park to check out the club.


This was then followed by news that the striker was sitting out Anderlecht’s friendly with Istanbul Basaksehir which kicked off earlier this afternoon. Mitrovic reported to have been left out with a transfer to Newcastle imminent, allegedly.


A third strand saw Imoh Ezekiel join Anderlecht on a season long loan yesterday from Al-Arabi.

The 21 year old Nigerian striker having been a success at Standard Liege before moving for over £6m last season to Qatar, and now returning (at least in the short-term)to play in Belgium as possibly Mitrovic’ replacement.

Wherever Aleksandar Mitrovic eventually ends up, this is truly a modern day pain of how so many transfers are conducted in public over an extended time.