Albert Einstein once said that the definition of insanity was doing the same thing over and over again, but expecting to see different results.

With that in mind, one can only assume that the back room staff at Newcastle United are in need of some treatment as it seems they are now turning their back on an alternative, potentially progressive manager, in favour of seemingly someone who fits more or less the same mould as those who have brought dismal, uninspiring and chiefly unsuccessful football to Tyneside in their last few seasons.

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The news that Patrick Vieira was to be interviewed for the possibly vacant managerial position at St James’s Park was music to the ears of most Newcastle fans, the former Arsenal and Juventus stalwart looked like a shining beacon of a hopeful future of exciting and competitive football.

However, in a move that paints Lee Charnley as a footballing troglodyte incapable of evolving into the modern era, it now seems as if Steve McClaren is the most likely candidate to be at the black and white helm next season and the sense of disappointment is palpable.

With many suggesting that Vieira’s interview was little more than a scare tactic used to create a sense of envy in McClaren, the club’s actual level of interest in Vieira remains fairly hazy.

However, Vieira was interested enough in the position to meet Charnley and Co, which suggests that there was a genuine desire on his part to take this club forward into the modern era of the sport, whilst giving it the hoof up the backside it desperately needs and it seems as if this was an opportunity missed by people hell-bent on hiring uninspiring leaders for their farcical, ill-functioning football fiasco.

Just as Mike Ashley seemed to be living up to promises he made in that now famous seemingly impromptu interview, the club are reverting back to its old ways.

Apparently forgetting the toils of the past few months and opting for the option which fits the club’s blueprint, the same blueprint that has seen the club dangle so perilously close to relegation far too many times.

It will be out of desperationift McClaren finds himself agreeing to the limited power that will be available to him at Newcastle.

Under no other footballing regime would a man with his recent track record be afforded the opportunity to step into one of the twenty money generating clubs in the world. To be tasked with solidifying it as a consistently competing team, whilst restoring its now fetid reputation.

This though is Newcastle United, where illogical ideas seem like golden propositions in the eyes of those in charge, if they fit in with their business motto – money before progress, wealth before success – which will ultimately decide who the board elects to hire, regardless of whoever else may be available or irrespective of what might be best for the club from a competitive point of view.

The club’s immovablestance on transfer and recruitment policy seem to have been a stumbling block in negotiations with Vieira, which comes as little surprise considering how poorly it has served previous managers.

It simply goes to show that these managerial interviews being conducted are little more than a contest to see who will jump the highest when asked by those in charge.

So we can assume that Claren brought his trampoline along to ensure that he leapt straight out of his desperate situation, into one of the safest managerial positions in football.

“We may have the cart, financially, but we now need to bolt the horse on” claimed Ashley in ‘that interview’, but a loyal carthorse is not what is needed at Newcastle right now.

For too long the club has languished near the bottom of the league, being led by beasts of burden with ideas and tactics that are incapable of pulling any weight in the premiership.

Newcastle need a champion thoroughbred with blinkers keeping it focused on moving forwards, to let the club climb on its back, charge off into the distance and leave the old decrepit cart behind to rot in its wake.

It seems as if that horse has ridden off into the sunset, leaving the club and its chances of a different and potentially exciting new era, to instead wait for the old steed to pick it up and trot unambitiously over the finish line, time and time again, into perpetuity, ad nauseum.

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